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Archive for the tag “ER+/PR-/HER2+”

You’re a cancer survivor – a bullet list

  • One day you feel a lump in your boob. Machines create images, doctors test a chunk. It’s cancer.
  • People say you’re a survivor the moment you announce your diagnosis. You think, “huh? What’d I do?”
  • Treatment begins in early May and concludes in late December. Start the new year clean, you think.
  • Through it all no one allows you to talk about the possibility of your death. It’s taboo.
  • 6 rounds of chemo didn’t kill all the cancer, but surgeon got the last bit. Radiation to seal the deal.
  • You think about what else the chemo might have missed. In places the docs aren’t looking.
  • You move from the apartment you’ve inhabited for 10 years to a big house with a huge yard.
  • Your brain feels foggy and you’re sure the cancer’s in your brain. It’s not.
  • You finish Herceptin in April, and begin hormone treatment that will last for five years.
  • Hot flashes ensue, along with joint pain that wakes you at night. Your knees sound like Velcro ripping.
  • You gain 15 pounds from the sudden menopause. Dropping to 500 calories a day doesn’t help.
  • You accept being plus-sized, and buy new clothes. Your age has made you invisible anyway.
  • You visit the oncologist every three months for an injection that shuts your ovaries down.
  • The joint pain is so bad your oncologist switches you to a different hormone medication.
  • Your oncologist tells you the new recommendation is 10 years of hormone meds. Not five.
  • Your joints feel better but you gain another 10 pounds in the space of two weeks. Right in the belly.

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  • You go back to college online and take on freelance work for the first time in a couple years.
  • You get a rash on your “bad” boob and panic that it’s Inflammatory Breast Cancer.
  • You consult your posse of  survivor friends. They reassure you, but tell you to go in.
  • It’s not inflammatory breast cancer. Either the antibiotics or steroid cream fixed it. You feel dumb.
  • You pass your first post-cancer mammogram with flying colors. You were expecting bad news.
  • Of your survivor posse, one has stage IV, after “beating it” nearly three years prior.
  • On next oncology visit you complain about weight gain. Obesity increases your chance of recurrence.
  • Doctor switches you back to original meds. You don’t lose any weight and the joint pain returns.
  • You pin all your hopes for the future and redemption for millennia of oppression on Hillary Clinton.
  • On election night you go to bed with a mouthful of marijuana oil before all the votes are in.
  • When you wake up and remember, you briefly consider suicide and settle for stopping your meds.
  • You gain another 20 pounds in anger, disbelief, and heartbreak. You get a safety pin tattoo.
  • In school you study psychology and plan to work with hospice patients and families.
  • You apply to volunteer in hospice, visiting patients. Your Stage IV friend tells you it’s your calling.
  • Your Stage IV friend asks if your brownie troop can come to her house and plant tulips.
  • Before you can gather the girls for the tulip project, your friend goes into hospice herself.
  • On the way to visit you think about what she’ll say. Maybe you’ll make a deathbed promise.
  • She doesn’t speak or open her eyes. You brought a huge bouquet of tulips that seem cruel now.
  • On your first day of hospice volunteer training, your Stage IV friend dies.
  • At the funeral you connect with a coworker from early in your career. She’s a survivor too.
  • That’s four of you, from just one small department in one company. Stats? Or the water?
  • At home you casually talk about what you’d like at your funeral. Your youngest stares at you.
  • You don’t think she knows that cancer kills people. You’d talked about sickness, but never death.
  • After your friend’s death you go back on your medication. Because not to insults her memory.
  • You take on tons of freelance work and study hard. You make money, contacts, and the Dean’s List.
  • Math and a new full-time job defeat you at school and you drop out of college for the fourth time.
  • You go on vacation and don’t take your medication. You don’t bother to start again at home.
  • You move into your dream house in a Norman Rockwell neighborhood where kids roam free.
  • Every night in the new house you dream about cancer. Here’s what you dream:
  • You dream about sobbing and clinging to your mother as you say “Mommy, I think I’m sick again.”
  • You dream about wasting away in a hospital bed, too weak to lift a book to read it.
  • You don’t think you’re psychic or clairvoyant. But what if the dream is a message from your body?
  • Twice, when you’ve dreamed your teeth fell out, you’ve been ill. Mono and pneumonia.
  • A friend dreamed her dead mother told her she had breast cancer. And she did.
  • You say, “I had a weird dream last night” “Was it about cancer coming back? I don’t want to hear it.”
  • You can’t talk to anyone about your fears. You just wallow in it. Silently. Alone.
  • You think about the new house and where you’ll convalesce. You buy a swing chair for the backyard.
  • You plan how to turn your new library into a bedroom and how you’ll watch the birds as you die.
  • You go camping to watch the total eclipse. You wonder if you’ll be alive for the next one.
  • The chest pain gets worse. One day at work you find yourself holding a cold can to your chest.
  • You have trouble catching your breath. You drive to the Emergency Room. You tell no one.
  • Your EKG, blood tests and chest X-ray are all clear. You’re a fool. You’re a hypochondriac.
  • You miss a big meeting, and confess to your boss you’re at the hospital.
  • You don’t want him to think you’re a sick person. You don’t think he knows about the cancer.
  • You’re already the oldest, fattest, most unsightly member of the team. You can’t afford more.
  • Your job is stressful and your brain isn’t as sharp as it was. Is it ageing or chemo or both?
  • Google tells you former smokers have an increased chance of lung metastasis.
  • At your oncology appointment you tell him about your chest pain. He refutes your Google information.
  • Your oncologist orders a CT scan to rule out pulmonary embolism and cancer. Refills meds.
  • He emails you late that night to tell you it’s clear. There’s something in your lung, but not cancer.
  • A regular doctor diagnoses an inflammation in the cartilage between sternum and ribs.
  • Prednisone clears up the lungs, and your eczema, plus your joint pain. But only for a week.
  • You feel relieved that the cancer’s not back so you go ahead with your plans to lead a new Brownie troop.
  • You want to just LIVE, but it’s always there in the back –and often front—of your mind. Cancer.
  • You wanted your life to be more meaningful, but you’ve quit school and haven’t done hospice work.
  • This is how you survive. Living between the recurrence nightmares. Pretending you’re “better.”
  • But deep down you’re convinced that cancer isn’t done with you yet.
  • And the only way to prove otherwise is to die of something else.
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Chemotherapy 1 of 6 – The Toxic Bride

Yeah, I wish!

Yeah, I wish!

Well, I did it! Got through my very first chemo session! Honestly, it was a breeze. The first one was long (5 hours), since I had to do long doses of my targeted therapy (Perjeta and Herceptin) for the HER2+ flavor of my cancer. But the next five rounds will only be 3 hours each.

Basically, I sat in a recliner and slept, played games, snacked, and read a little. It was like flying business class to NYC except I ended up where I started.

Here’s how it went down:

First, I met with Dr. Cap and he was disappointed that we didn’t yet have the pathology report for the MRI-guided biopsy I had the day before. He called the lab and they weren’t ready. Then he got on the phone and conferred with my surgeon (Who needs a new nickname. He’s so much more than “Boobcutter”). They agree that it was okay to go ahead and start treatment now. What’s in my left boob didn’t set off the PET scan, so it could be a pre-cancerous duct or something that we’d just keep an eye on. There’s a tiny clip in there now, so they’ll know where to look in the future. (This brings my shrapnel count to three: one in Turdy the main tumor in my right boob, one in Son of Turdy the ginormous malignant lymph node in my right armpit, and now this left boob business.)

Anyway, Dr. Cap isn’t happy with my iron levels and he wants me to take iron supplements.

“Yeah, but then I might not poop,” I say.
“Well, the diarrhea from the chemo will probably balance that out.” He grins.

Gunny and I wore pins!

Gunny and I wore pins!

Cleared for take-off I choose the best chair in the infusion suite. Off in the corner, next to the windows, across from the blanket warmer. One of the chemo nurses “accessed my port” to start the IV. This was by far the most painful bit of the entire cancer carnival so far. I think I mentioned that I have an extra-thick collarbone and my surgeon had to go pretty deep to get the central line connected. Anyway, the needle she started with was too short, and she thought she could get it to connect better if she pushed down on my chest. It felt like being stomped on by a horse. I only had that surgery ten days ago, lady! Easy! So she gets a longer needle and it worked fine and I chilled out.

She waited patiently while I took my round 1 selfie.

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And then the party began. First bag was a cocktail of anti-nausea medication and steroids. Then came the Benadryl. Luckily my husband was still there at that point because a nurse came around to set up appointments for the Neulasta shot (which stimulates bone marrow to produce white blood cells), a blood draw, and Round 2. I was pretty loopy by then and Gunny handled the appointment-setting. Then he went off to watch the new Avengers movie for the second time so I could nap.

My chemo nurse swapped the Benadryl bag for an hour’s worth of Perjeta. This is the HER2+ killer that still has new-car smell. It’s sort of companion treatment to Herceptin and makes it work harder and more effectively.

I listened to the Great Gatsby soundtrack on my iPod and slept for about an hour.

When I woke up it was time for 90 minutes of Herceptin. This is the shit that is going to save my life. If you want an entertaining look at the discovery of this wonderdrug, watch Living Proof. It stars Harry Connick Jr as Dr. Dennis Slamon who is a hero much more impressive than Iron Man or even my beloved Thor. It has a semi-dippy “Let’s put on lipstick before our cancer drug trial” montage (It IS a Lifetime movie) but it’s otherwise great. Inspiring.

I spent most of this time on my phone keeping up with what I can only describe as the most monumentally awesome thing a person could have happen to them. One of my friends, Kari Toyama (who is just a stellar human being as well as being cool as hell) spearheaded a campaign to have friends post selfies and signs with the hashtag #lovetrixiefuckcancer. So all day I was inundated with more love and support and laughter than I could ever have imagined. Take a look:

kari ToyamaMichelle Obama Shannon I don't always desktop battle wonder jbb Steve Morgan desktop awesome drawing batle Kitty Match Made in Halo puppies! Groot Kristin JVB Max D JamMarcella Dirty Diva Nikki Lexi Kiki Nelly Cory Mom Katie Tara Tyler Philip Josephine Carolyn Kathleen Trisha Angel and Alex Doc Sam Hollywood sign The Boss Alison

I have some un-fun remnants of working in the video game industry, but THIS, my god. THESE PEOPLE are the gift of those years. Kari said to me “PSH it was nothing.” I’m sure you’ll agree that nothing could be further from the truth. It was EVERYTHING.

A glimpse at my Twitter feed yesterday.

A glimpse at my Twitter feed yesterday.

Go ahead and blow your nose and wipe those tears. I’ll wait.

After my targeted HER2 antibody drugs, it was time for the heavy duty shit. The actual chemotherapy. One hour each of Taxotere and Carboplatin. I ate half a peanut butter sandwich and drank water. Oh, and some Swedish Fish. My husband returned from the movies and I started reading a book my friend Kim recommended: A Kind Worth Killing.

This precious thing is Allie the Feel-Better Fairy. Thanks to my dear friend Nori. <3

This precious thing is Allie the Feel-Better Fairy. Thanks to my dear friend Nori. ❤

And then, it was over. I got home in time to meet my baby at the bus stop. I was kinda worn out, and lounged in bed and read. Not much appetite for dinner, but I did my best. I had an ice cream sandwich for dessert.

So here’s a couple things I learned about chemo that I didn’t know before:

1. You are allowed to pee! They can unplug your IV from the wall and you can run on battery power and shuffle your ass to the potty hauling your drugs on a pole. Comes in handy when they’re filling you full of liquids.

2. For a couple days post chemo, you are TOXIC. All of your bodily fluids contain chemo drugs and you don’t want anyone to get any on them. What does this mean? If I have night sweat, I gotta sleep alone. After using the toilet I have to shut the lid and flush twice. TWICE! I feel like I’m murdering the Earth! The most surprising though? NO SEX. Kinda wish they’d warned me about that one the night before so I could store up. But yeah, the chemo nurse said no sex at all for a few days and no unprotected sex for about 8 days. WHO KNEW? Talk about unfuckable!

So how is my toxic ass doing today? Not bad. I felt a little bit queasy when I woke up, so I got up, popped a Zofran and went back to bed. My chemo nurse (and also the amazing Ann who blogs at Breast Cancer? But Doctor I hate Pink and wrote this super helpful Top Four Tips for Getting Through Chemo post) both said to take meds at the first twinge of queaze, so I did. Thanks, ladies!

I went to the hospital this morning for my Neulasta shot. It can cause bone pain, so they have you take Claritin (yes,

I told her she was like our beloved Seahawks quarterback Russell Wilson when he does his weekly visits to Children's Hospital.

I told her she was like our beloved Seahawks quarterback Russell Wilson when he does his weekly visits to Children’s Hospital.

the OTC allergy drug!) beforehand. My daughter came with us to see the place Mommy goes to get her medicine and everyone smiled to see her. She says it’s not scary and she wants to go back. We’ll see.

Next up is a blood draw on May 15 to make sure my white counts are okay. It was really sad yesterday to see a woman come in for her chemo all sassy and joking around only to be sent home for low white counts.

Then, Round 2 happens May 26.

In the meantime, I’m hanging in there. I’m still riding the steriod high that kinda props you up the first couple of days, and have heard that days 4-7 are the worst. I will keep you updated, and I’m not going to be polite. For now, I await the coin flip: which will come first, puking or diarrhea, or BOTH?

Thank you for all the love and support!

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